Shop

  Free shipping on orders of $45+

Exception is the delivery of the book.

Categories
Saint-Anne shallots (Allium ascalonicum)
9.99 $ 9.99 $ 9.99 CAD
Sale between july 20th and november 15th only

** CANNOT BE SHIPPED OUTSIDE OF CANADA **
This product is only available to order between July 1 and November 1 of each year. Treasures of our Quebec heritage, the Sainte-Anne shallot is a perfectly perennial alliaceae. It comfortably spends our Quebec winters under the cover of snow without any damage. It grows in the spring, very early, and we can then taste it as a green shallot. Then it multiplies and its foliage dries up. We will pull it out on June 24, on St-Jean Baptiste Day. Then we will dry it completely at home, to eat it but also to replant it at Ste-Anne, on July 26th. It will begin to grow again and store up for the winter. Then we start again in the spring!This product is only available between July 1 and November 1 of each year.Package of 8 shallots from Ste-Anne;For more information, * The price of this item is a little higher than our regular pouches to cover shipping costs*

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Allium ascalonicum
Common names: Shallots of Saint-Anne
English: Saint-Anne shallots
Family: Liliaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The shallot winters well in Quebec, under the snow cover, but does not keep well indoors.
Radish D'Avignon (Raphanus sativus)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This pretty elongated radish, red with a white tip, is an ancestral variety that comes from the south of France. An ideal vegetable for filling holes in the vegetable garden in the spring, it also deserves a place of choice there. Favorite of beginner gardeners, resow as many times as you want to harvest all season long!

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Raphanus sativus
Common names: Avignon radish
English: D'avignon radish
Family: Brassicaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Make several successive sowings during the summer to have several harvests.
Eggplant Rosa Blanca (Solanum melongena)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This old variety of eggplant was introduced on the market around the 1910s. It produces abundant and early dark purple fruits, pear-shaped, measuring about 15 cm. This variety has stood the test of time and can still be found more than 100 years after its common appearance in the vegetable gardens of amateur gardeners.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Solanum melongena
Common name: Eggplant Rosa blanca
English: Rosa Blanca Eggplant
Family: Solanaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Benefits from staking to prevent the branches from breaking under the weight of the fruit.
Forellenschluss lettuce (Lactuca sativa var, longifolia 'Forellenschluss')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Red speckled romaine lettuce. It is the sweetest in our collection. In 1997, during a tasting competition, the Forellenschluss received 1st prize among 900 other varieties of lettuce. Very beautiful, it will seduce more than one on the plate. Heritage variety from Austria. Its name means "spotted like a trout".

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Lactuca sativa var. longifolia 'Forellenschluss'
Common names: Forellenschluss lettuce, romaine type lettuce
English: Forellenschluss Lettuce, Trout Back lettuce, Freckles lettuce.
Family: Asteraceae
Kahnawake Mohawk Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Vigorous climbing bean that can reach 12 feet. Soft green pods, sweet and slightly flattened bean. Very productive. Usually grown for its dry, beige grain streaked with chocolate veins, but can be eaten fresh as well. Climbs so high that our stakes could not resist and fell at the end of the season, under the weight of the plants. Originally cultivated by the Iroquois First Nations of Kahnawake (Quebec). One of the finest beans in our collection.
True Red Cranberry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Climbing bean to be shelled. Variety from the Abenaki First Nations and part of the Slow Food Ark of Taste. The beans, when dry, are a fiery red making them look like a cranberry. White hilt. Rich flavor. Rare variety having been rediscovered by bean collector John Withee, who got it from Mr. Taylor of Steep Falls, Maine, after 11 years of research. He had read the description in an encyclopedia dating back to the 1700s. In 1981, John Withee donated his collection of 1,186 beans to the Seed Savers Exchange (USA). This variety appeared in several eastern New England catalogs in the 1850s, including one from Montreal, dated 1899, which listed this variety as very popular.

Nose Pierced Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with very small delicate pods. Early and prolific, this variety gives small seeds of a beautiful golden brown. It would come from the Nez Percé Native American tribe. Maintained for generations by the Denny family of Idaho (1930), this bean will produce certain twigs (“runner”) about 3 feet that can be staked or left on the ground. Can be eaten dry or fresh. 5 to 6 seeds per pod. Endangered, please share!

Staking is not compulsory, can bush on the ground.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Bean 'Nez Perce
English: Nez perce beans, Indian woman yellow beans.
Family: Fabaceae
Mennonite bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mennonite')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very vigorous climbing green bean producing beautiful purple mauve flowers as well as very long striped green pods which are delicious eaten fresh. When dry, the beans are striped gray on a pale background. Note that the bean hilum is not located in the center of the bean, since it is not symmetrical. It therefore gives the impression of having been slightly crushed once dry. The Semences du patrimoine organization lists this variety as being very rare. Probably come from the Mennonites of the region of Waterloo in Ontario.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mennonite'
Common names: English Mennonite Bean, Mennonite Bean
Family: Fabaceae
Rocquencourt Butter Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Beurre de Rocquencourt)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Golden yellow bean with long, thin pods. Very good productivity and stability. Originally from France and previously from Algeria. The more you pick, the more it produces, over a long period of time. Its advantage lies in the ability of its pods to remain tender for several days on the plant. So advantageous for traveling gardeners or market gardeners too busy to pick their beans every day. The seeds are elongated, deep black. One of the tastiest in our collection. Beans of this type were introduced to France around the 1840s under the name Haricot d'Alger, because they supposedly originated in Algeria. From this genetic pool of black-seed beans, the French developed other varieties including butters from Rocquencourt, a town near Versailles.

Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to avoid the proliferation of diseases. With us, it is very resistant to diseases and very little watered, since it is mulched throughout the summer. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Dutch Princess bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Dutch Princess')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with small, round, sweet pods. A delight! This variety was found on a seed exchange table at a Seed Festival in Frelighsburg, Quebec, in 2013. It has a name that seems old, and is not listed by seed saving organizations in the Canada or the United States. Limited quantities. VERY RARE. Anyone who can provide us with information on where it comes from would be appreciated as this is one of our best beans! Addendum In November 2016 we found a trace of a Duch Princesse bean in the "New-Zeland Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science /Experimental Agriculture" of March 1978. The origin of the bean named Duch Princess is believed to be Holland. He was also named by the seed company William Damn Seeds who would sell an improved variety from a Duch Princess bean. We find another trace of it in a research center in... Tanzania, in Arusha, (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT)) in 1972.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Apache bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf bean giving beautiful tender and tasty green pods, rounder than flattened. Eat fresh or dry. The seed is white speckled with black and red, on one side only. A nice asymmetry. Dried grains, when cooked, are very sweet. Productive. Variety that would date from 1986, having been selected in the United States.

Fresh (green bean) or dried

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Moroccan Watercress (Lactusa Sativa)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Crisp spring lettuce, with elongated, strongly cut leaves and a soft green color. Its taste is very sweet. It's easy to grow, and if you let it go to seed, watercress will reseed itself every year. It can also be used as lettuce to cut, as and when needed. Italian heritage variety.
Montreal Melon (Cucumis melo)
5.50 $ 5.50 $ 5.5 CAD
Also known by the English name of "Montreal Market Muskmelon", or "Montreal Nutmeg Melon", this melon with green flesh and a slight taste of nutmeg has practically disappeared. The first traces of the Montreal melon come from the Jesuits, who cultivated it in 1684. It enjoyed strong popularity in the early 1900s and until the 1950s, when galloping urbanization, the lack of succession and the high cost of labor signed its death warrant. It was cultivated by three families, the Aubins, the Décaries and the Gormans. According to the Potager d'antan, the melon was meticulously selected from the middle of the 17th century before being stabilized in 1870 under the name Melon de Montréal. In the 1880s, the American seed merchant wrote in his catalog that he was one of the biggest sellers throughout New England. In short, it was forgotten when the farms disappeared from the Island of Montreal, before being found by a journalist in a gene bank in the United States. Here it is now, smaller than it was in the original photos, but with the same great taste! Please note that if you wish to save your own seeds, you must ensure that no other variety of melon grows at a kilometer around, otherwise you will have to pollinate it by hand.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Cultivation of the Montreal Melon is difficult. It requires rich soil, abundant watering and heat. The maturity of the melon is difficult to establish and, once picked, it keeps for a very short time. However, it is delicious!
Mémé de Beauce Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
In 1995, a bag of 200 seeds was discovered in the attic of a house that had been abandoned for several years in Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce, by a carpenter making repairs. Neighbors said there hadn't been a vegetable garden at this address for over 60 years. Mr. Gérard Parent, to whom they were given, tried to grow them, but only three germinated. From these plants come all the Mémés de Beauce known in Quebec.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions about 10 days before planting by taking them out during the day. Lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring the leaves out.
Burnet (Sanguisorba minor)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Edible perennial. Its name comes from the Latin sanguis (blood) and sorbere (smell, absorb) and refers to the haemostatic properties of the plant, linked to the tannins contained in its roots. It is also very rich in vitamin C.; Before parsley dethroned it, it was used in salads, sauces, omelettes, soups, etc. Its flavor is reminiscent of cucumber. We pick the leaves according to our needs. In the garden, it requires little care, just a little love and fresh water. In Quebec, it resists winter well and can be eaten late in the season. Harvest young leaves throughout the summer.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Very rustic. In the spring, put a light layer of compost on the surface and mulch. If grown in a pot, let it dry out between 2 waterings. Renew the mulching before winter.
Canada Crookneck Squash (Cucurbita moschata)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
C. moschataVery popular in the last century, this winter squash has practically disappeared in favor of more standardized and high-performance varieties. No doubt her elongated shape and twisted neck made her undesirable in the age of industrial trade and transport. It is moreover to meet the new market criteria that we would have developed, from the Canada Crookneck, the Butternut variety. The Canada Crookneck is however delicious. She is listed on the Slow Food Ark of Taste. Excellent in soup, it will be exquisite transformed into fries. It is so sweet that it can replace sweet potatoes in all your recipes.;In recent years, it has reappeared among small seed companies. At Terre Promise, we want to preserve it, cultivate it and share it for many years to come!

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Perfect for the culture of the three sisters. Be careful, squash and pumpkins do not like having disturbed roots. If you are seedling indoors, transplant gently. For this reason, we prefer to sow directly in the garden.
Banana Leg Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Banana Legs')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This Italian type tomato gives the best canned tomatoes. Little juice, very fleshy, it is sweet and delicious. Despite its sordid name, which literally means "banana legs" (have you ever seen bananas running?), it looks proud and its plant is healthy.

When planting, lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring out the leaves upwards.
Black Seed Butter Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Black Seed Butter Bean)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very productive dwarf yellow bean. Its taste is delicious and it does not pale in comparison with the Beurre de Rocquencourt bean. It is eaten young for its yellow and tender pods, or when ripe for its black seeds. It will ensure you a bountiful harvest over a long period of time. The more you pick, the more it will produce. This traditional variety comes to us from Sainte-Hélène de Kamouraska, in Bas-Saint-Laurent, where the family of Rollande Labrie (born in 1923) has always cultivated it. We are proud to make it accessible to the public and to ensure its safeguard.Originally, the butter bean comes from Algeria. It was introduced in France in the 1840s under the name Haricot d'Alger. Thereafter, the French developed several varieties of yellow beans with black seeds, including the famous Beurre de Rocquencourt, named after the city of the same name near Versailles.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS.
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Cucumber Aunt Alice (Cucumis sativus)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Aunt Alice (Marie-Alice Laflamme Gosselin) was still growing her cucumber at age 90. She chose the largest and most beautiful to produce seeds that she soaked in milk, the day before Saint-Antoine, before planting them in the garden, in good rich and fertile black soil. Then, the succession not being there, the last seeds were entrusted to a passionate man who introduced us to this excellent variety.;This very productive cucumber is resistant to diseases. It is easy to digest. We prefer small cucumbers to larger fruits, for their juicy, crunchy and fragrant flesh.;Exceptional heritage variety.

Few seeds because it is difficult to extract seeds from this cucumber, it gives really little.
Kale Red Russian (Brassica napus ssp. pabularia)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Brassica napus ssp. pabularia A heirloom variety of Siberian-style kale, Red Russian forms delicious bluish-red wavy leaves with purple veins. Its size is much larger than most varieties of kale. Pick the leaves when they are still young and tender or when they are fully ripe. Their flavor will be even better after a frost. This variety was introduced to Canada around 1885 by Russian merchants. Particularly disease resistant.