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Kahnawake Mohawk Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Vigorous climbing bean that can reach 12 feet. Soft green pods, sweet and slightly flattened bean. Very productive. Usually grown for its dry, beige grain streaked with chocolate veins, but can be eaten fresh as well. Climbs so high that our stakes could not resist and fell at the end of the season, under the weight of the plants. Originally cultivated by the Iroquois First Nations of Kahnawake (Quebec). One of the finest beans in our collection.
True Red Cranberry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Climbing bean to be shelled. Variety from the Abenaki First Nations and part of the Slow Food Ark of Taste. The beans, when dry, are a fiery red making them look like a cranberry. White hilt. Rich flavor. Rare variety having been rediscovered by bean collector John Withee, who got it from Mr. Taylor of Steep Falls, Maine, after 11 years of research. He had read the description in an encyclopedia dating back to the 1700s. In 1981, John Withee donated his collection of 1,186 beans to the Seed Savers Exchange (USA). This variety appeared in several eastern New England catalogs in the 1850s, including one from Montreal, dated 1899, which listed this variety as very popular.

Nose Pierced Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with very small delicate pods. Early and prolific, this variety gives small seeds of a beautiful golden brown. It would come from the Nez Percé Native American tribe. Maintained for generations by the Denny family of Idaho (1930), this bean will produce certain twigs (“runner”) about 3 feet that can be staked or left on the ground. Can be eaten dry or fresh. 5 to 6 seeds per pod. Endangered, please share!

Staking is not compulsory, can bush on the ground.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Bean 'Nez Perce
English: Nez perce beans, Indian woman yellow beans.
Family: Fabaceae
Mennonite bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mennonite')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very vigorous climbing green bean producing beautiful purple mauve flowers as well as very long striped green pods which are delicious eaten fresh. When dry, the beans are striped gray on a pale background. Note that the bean hilum is not located in the center of the bean, since it is not symmetrical. It therefore gives the impression of having been slightly crushed once dry. The Semences du patrimoine organization lists this variety as being very rare. Probably come from the Mennonites of the region of Waterloo in Ontario.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mennonite'
Common names: English Mennonite Bean, Mennonite Bean
Family: Fabaceae
Rocquencourt Butter Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Beurre de Rocquencourt)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Golden yellow bean with long, thin pods. Very good productivity and stability. Originally from France and previously from Algeria. The more you pick, the more it produces, over a long period of time. Its advantage lies in the ability of its pods to remain tender for several days on the plant. So advantageous for traveling gardeners or market gardeners too busy to pick their beans every day. The seeds are elongated, deep black. One of the tastiest in our collection. Beans of this type were introduced to France around the 1840s under the name Haricot d'Alger, because they supposedly originated in Algeria. From this genetic pool of black-seed beans, the French developed other varieties including butters from Rocquencourt, a town near Versailles.

Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to avoid the proliferation of diseases. With us, it is very resistant to diseases and very little watered, since it is mulched throughout the summer. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Dutch Princess bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Dutch Princess')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with small, round, sweet pods. A delight! This variety was found on a seed exchange table at a Seed Festival in Frelighsburg, Quebec, in 2013. It has a name that seems old, and is not listed by seed saving organizations in the Canada or the United States. Limited quantities. VERY RARE. Anyone who can provide us with information on where it comes from would be appreciated as this is one of our best beans! Addendum In November 2016 we found a trace of a Duch Princesse bean in the "New-Zeland Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science /Experimental Agriculture" of March 1978. The origin of the bean named Duch Princess is believed to be Holland. He was also named by the seed company William Damn Seeds who would sell an improved variety from a Duch Princess bean. We find another trace of it in a research center in... Tanzania, in Arusha, (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT)) in 1972.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Apache bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf bean giving beautiful tender and tasty green pods, rounder than flattened. Eat fresh or dry. The seed is white speckled with black and red, on one side only. A nice asymmetry. Dried grains, when cooked, are very sweet. Productive. Variety that would date from 1986, having been selected in the United States.

Fresh (green bean) or dried

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Black Seed Butter Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Black Seed Butter Bean)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very productive dwarf yellow bean. Its taste is delicious and it does not pale in comparison with the Beurre de Rocquencourt bean. It is eaten young for its yellow and tender pods, or when ripe for its black seeds. It will ensure you a bountiful harvest over a long period of time. The more you pick, the more it will produce. This traditional variety comes to us from Sainte-Hélène de Kamouraska, in Bas-Saint-Laurent, where the family of Rollande Labrie (born in 1923) has always cultivated it. We are proud to make it accessible to the public and to ensure its safeguard.Originally, the butter bean comes from Algeria. It was introduced in France in the 1840s under the name Haricot d'Alger. Thereafter, the French developed several varieties of yellow beans with black seeds, including the famous Beurre de Rocquencourt, named after the city of the same name near Versailles.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS.
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Skunk bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. 'Skunk')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Rare, resistant and very productive variety, formerly cultivated by the Iroquois. The plant can climb up to 2 meters in height and produces white and purple flowers. Young, the beans can be eaten as small green beans. Its name means skunk in English. Indeed, its magnificent beans are speckled with black and white spots, or sometimes entirely black. Their flat shape is reminiscent of lima beans. When ripe, they are ideal for making soups. Personally, we have tested them in baked beans, and they are delicious mixed with Kahnawake Mohawk. This bean was rediscovered in Chester, Vermont and saved by Gail Flagg of Fort Kent, Maine (USA). Perfect for the three sisters, to grow with Canada Croockneck squash.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris var. 'skunk'
Common names: Climbing bean, skunk bean.
English: Skunk Bean, Chester Bean, Flagg Bean
Family: Fabaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease.
The best dwarf beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Here is a mixture of dwarf beans selected for their flavor, their color and their resistance to climatic hazards. You will therefore find Beurre de Rocquencourt (yellow), Dutch Princess (green), Apache (green), black seed butter (yellow), Velor (purple), Comtesse de Chambord (green) and several others, in order to bring the biodiversity on your plate and help you discover a world of beans!
Grandmother bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Climbing green beans with 6 to 7 seeds in each pod. These are a pretty pink, very small, and very tasty when eaten dry. Is just as delicious fresh, and very very prolific. It was at a Seed Festival that Marie-Jeanne Disant, from Quebec, gave this bean to Mr. René Paquet, then volunteer representative of the Seeds of Diversity Canada kiosk. This one shared some of them with me, and when we grew them, we were immediately delighted with their performance... and their color!Marie-Jeanne Saying "I'm very happy to find other lovers of my grandmother's beans. I have been growing them since the 1970s and give them to whoever wants to take care of them, telling myself that it is important to save this heritage!For the record, I I actually got these beans from my grandmother, who lived in France and almost never moved from her little hometown in Ile-de-France, unlike these beans that have crossed the continents! from his neighbor from Switzerland who gave them to him between the two wars... How these beans arrived in Europe and ended up in Switzerland, I have no idea! But when I emigrated to the 90s from France for Quebec, I brought some in my shoes, telling myself that I was not doing a great from a trick to the regulations since all in all, I was only bringing these beans back to their continent of origin (...) Another small specification, they are eaten green even when the small seeds are forming inside, because they are very tender. (...)"Later, Madame Disant will tell us that the beans were in the shoes of her suitcase, not the shoes in her feet.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Grandmother bean
English: Grandmother pole bean
Family: Fabaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:
Need to be tutored.
Thibodeau bean from Beauce County (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Old dwarf cultivar from Beauce in Quebec, this bean is eaten fresh or dried. Its green pods are streaked with purple. According to many, it makes the best baked beans, but proponents of the Famille Boucher bean disagree. The solution? Mix the two.;The Beauce was a territory formerly occupied by the St. Lawrence Iroquois Nation. It would therefore be possible that it is a descendant of the beans that these people cultivated. When the First Settlers arrived, many exchanges took place between the two populations, and the beans were passed on to the newcomers. They, on the other hand, subsequently selected several varieties over many years, which favored the appearance of new lines in the varieties. The Thibodeau bean from Beauce County was found by Mr. Marc Warsha. It was actually Mr. Martin Roy of St-Zacharie, in Beauce, who gave him seeds. the cultivation of this bean goes back 4 generations, to Mrs. Thibodeau, from Beauceville, the great-great…grandmother of Martin Roy. The name, Thibodeau from Beauce County, appears for the first time in the catalog heritage seeds in 2003.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Thibodeau bean, marbled bean, heritage bean
English: Bush Bean
Family: Fabaceae
Countess of Chambord bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
The Comtesse de Chambord bush bean is a very old variety (1880s) originating, as its name suggests, from the Chambord region of France. Its small pods with elongated white grains and excessively thin skin have a remarkable quality that makes it a highly esteemed variety. Branched and late plant.
Bean Velour (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Stringless dwarf bean, purple in color. The plant is beautiful in the garden, with its small, dark, deep purple pods, but its extra-fine beans are delicious in the kitchen, and excellent for freezing. On the other hand, the rascal, he will play a trick on you when cooking, he will turn green again.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS.
When cooked, it turns green.
Geneviève spilled everything (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
In the studio, Geneviève got her laces tangled, and brought down all the cabarets! So here are our best climbing beans, in all colors and flavors! Skunk, True Red Cranberry, Kahnawake Mohawk, Turkey craw, Mennonite, Mayflower and Grand-mère.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common name: Climbing beans
English: Pole Bean
Family: Fabaceae
Daroi bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very vigorous climbing yellow bean producing beautiful long stringless yellow pods which are delicious eaten fresh. The man who gave it to us was collecting the seeds from his bush beans year after year when he noticed that his beans were becoming vines! He named them Daroi and we were surprised how good they were so we share them with you!
Iroquois Bread bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
These large mottled red and brown beans were grown in most Iroquoian communities, also called Haudenosaunee. They were shared with us by the Mohawk. Any First Nations person is welcome to ask us for free.
Grandma Dinel climbing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This precious bean bears the name of their guardian, say Maximilienne Corbeil Dinel, who would have grown them for many years at her home. There are several benefits to growing them. It produces long, rounded yellow pods, its flowering is spread out until the frost period and the formation of its grains is rapid.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Request a tutor. Harvest fresh beans before they reach full maturity for a less floury texture.
Jean-Léo Collard climbing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
At a Seed Festival, I sat next to a friendly-looking old man. Soon we started discussing seeds and commenting on our purchases and finds! This is how a beautiful friendship was born that lasted more than ten years. Terre Promise was only in its infancy, and very quickly Jean-Leo Collard embarked on the project by tinkering with us an incalculable number of tools and machines specific to seed cleaning and bagging. He marveled at the generous harvests of the farm, he loved to talk about gardening and above all, he took me to eat at his favorite restaurant, Chez Willinsky. Jean reassured me in the darkest moments, when it's difficult to be an entrepreneur and I wanted to screw everything up... He believed in the Promised Land. Jean left us this fall 2021 at the end of a full life. In his honor, we decided to name a variety of beans developed on the farm for a few years, a mixture of the dwarf bean Velor and an unknown climbing bean. The Jean Léo Collard climbing bean has a beautiful deep purple color, sometimes mottled with green. It is cordless, quite long and very thin, crunchy to the bite. We are very proud of it! Thank you Jean for your unconditional support and friendship. Garden in peace.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common name: Pole bean
English: Pole Bean
Family: Fabaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Request a tutor.
Scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Decorative and edible climbing bean. Children love to open the green pods and discover the large two-tone beans. Cover trellises, fences and gazebos with beautiful scarlet red and white flowers that are sure to attract hummingbirds. In the garden, beans provide nitrogen to the soil and promote the cultivation of other vegetables.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. Must be staked, can reach 4 meters high. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.