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Nettle (Urtica dioica)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD


MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Nettle seeds do not all germinate simultaneously. CAUTION, invasive plant.
Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Calendula is an annual plant that produces a multitude of orange and yellow flowers. Also called garden marigold, it is grown both for its ornamental appeal and for its medicinal properties. We use the edible flowers in herbal tea and its petals will nicely decorate your salads. Commonly used in the manufacture of balms, calendula would have healing and anti-inflammatory properties. Generous and very easy to grow, it will flower until the autumn frosts.
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Because we all had a grandmother who made rhubarb jam for us... An easy-to-grow perennial, this plant is perfect for lovers of "Guerilla Gardening". You wait for nightfall, then you discreetly plant a rhubarb seedling in a flower bed in plain view of the city. Small insignificant growth, it will go unnoticed. Then within a year or two, it will keep producing everlasting leaves with delicious stems and will be too healthy (you'll see to that) for the city to eliminate. Then you will then provide your grandmother with a stem that she will then return to you in a Mason jar, in the form of jam. Isn't it beautiful, the eternal cycle of nature?

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:
Requires little care once implanted. Consider cutting the flower stalk to encourage leaf development. Direct seeding offers a lower germination rate than indoor seeding.

CAUTION Rhubarb leaves are poisonous, consume only the stalk.
Zinnia (Zinnia sp.)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Amazing and elegant flower, the zinnia is an annual that comes in multiple colors sunny yellow, bright orange or fuchsia pink. Its nectar will relentlessly attract hummingbirds and pollinators.;Zinnia is found primarily in Mexico. Following the sun, it spread across the dry grasslands, over an area stretching from southwestern North America to South America.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Good dried flower. Cutting faded flowers stimulates flowering.
Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Mixed sunflowers.;The word "sunflower" is borrowed from the Italian girasole, "which rotates with the sun". There are many names or vernacular expressions for it: great sun, garden sun, common sun, parrot seed, sunflower... The protein-rich seed is an excellent food source for birds and humans. Depending on the variety sown, your sunflower plants will bear a single large flower or several small ones.;Small varieties and very large varieties in a mixture.

CARE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: By the end of September, sunflower seeds are ripening. The stem dries up and the flowers bow their heads. It's time to harvest. Cut off the whole heads. They must then be dried in a dry place. Check often that the sunflower does not rot. After a few days, the seeds will sound "hollow" and "dry" when you run your fingernail over them. You just have to rub to remove the rest of the flowers, and scrape with your fingers to loosen the seeds.
Malabar spinach (Basella rubra)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
The baselle is native to the Malabar Coast in the Indian peninsula. Used as a replacement for spinach, it likes heat and light, since it comes from southern regions. A climber with delicious leaves that we eat all summer long, it is as good as it is beautiful to look at. It can be grown both in pots and in the ground.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: basella rubra
Common names: Malabar spinach, Baselle
English: Malabar spinach, ceylon spinach
Family: Basellaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Malabar spinach is a tropical climbing plant, be careful not to take them out too early in the spring as they don't like the cold.
Hollyhock (Alcea rosea)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Beautiful large perennial that can reach two meters, pink to purple in color. Gives the garden a touch of sensitivity by attracting pollinators who can count on a source of pollen and nectar throughout the summer. Generous flowering. Reseeds itself.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Alcea rosea
Common names: Passe-rose, Passerose or Primerose
English: Hollyhock
Family: Malvaceae
Strawberry spinach (Chenopodium capitatum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Strawberry spinach is one of the forgotten vegetables that is making a remarkable comeback in our vegetable gardens. It is cultivated for its leaves which are eaten fresh in salads or steamed and for its magnificent red fruits. However, make no mistake, although they look a lot like strawberries, they taste more like beets. The fruit should be consumed in moderation since the seed contains toxic agents.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Chenopodium capitatum
Common names: Strawberry spinach
English: Strawberry blite
Family: Amaranthaceae
Tagetes ( Tagetes sp.)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Tagetes, or Marigold, is a very floriferous annual that is easy to grow. Its yellow, orange and red flowering embellishes gardens, balconies and terraces. In the vegetable garden, it is also famous for repelling insects such as nematodes. You can salvage the dried flowers, take the seeds and replant them next year! Marigolds are also used for natural dyeing, producing beautiful yellows, yellow-greens and oranges.
St. John's wort (Hypericum sp.)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
St. John's wort is a perennial and hardy plant that is found naturally in meadows near roadsides, in infertile soils. This plant produces many starry yellow flowers with a balsamic smell. Easy to grow and adapting to any type of soil, St. John's wort will be very useful for pleasantly furnishing difficult cultivation sites in your garden.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Hypericum sp.
Common names: St. John's wort, common, perforated
English: St. John's Worth
Family: Hypericaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Reseeds itself year after year.
Broomcorn (Sorghum bicolor)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Sorghum is grown mainly in Africa and Asia for these edible grains, as a cereal. This variety, with its shiny grains in beige, brown, red or even black hues, can also be used to form magnificent ornamental bouquets. But that's not all! Once the grains have been harvested, the remaining stems can turn into a useful biodegradable broom. Variety obtained from Witches' Brooms.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Similar to the cultivation of maize
Dyer's chamomile (Cota tinctoria)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Pretty little flower, similar to the daisy but entirely yellow. It will brighten up your garden with its abundant flowering from the end of June to the end of September. Dyer's chamomile will also delight pollinators. Its main interest, however, lies in the rich dye that can be obtained from it, as its name suggests. The dyers' chamomile makes it possible to naturally dye natural fibers yellow, buff or orange.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
reseeds itself
Nathalie flax (Linum usitatissimum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Before the introduction of cotton and synthetic fibers, flax held a significant place in the households of yesteryear Quebec. It was used everywhere, from bed linens to socks! And even before that, this plant has quite a history! Flax was probably the first plant fiber to be woven. It is believed to have been first domesticated in the region of the Fertile Crescent. Remains dating back 36,000 years have been found in a cave in Georgia. It was also a preferred textile in ancient Egypt. The fiber produces a flexible, lightweight, absorbent, thermoregulating, and durable fabric, which explains its popularity. The plant is easy to grow, and its delicate blue flowers are quite lovely. The fibers are found in the core of the stem and are extracted through a controlled decomposition process called retting.

The Nathalie flax is part of the flax preservation program

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Harvest one month after flowering, or two weeks after seed capsules have formed.

Number of seeds per packet: 200
Mammoth Sunflower
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
These giants won’t go unnoticed in your garden!

Indeed, mammoth sunflowers can grow over 3m in height, and they produce gorgeous yellow flowers that can reach more than 30 cm in diameter.
Despite their height, they do not require any tutoring. They can however be a tutor themselves for your other climbing plants such as beans!
Thanks to their fast growth, these sunflowers can also create seasonal plant walls, hedgerows and windbreaks.
The seeds are rich and can be enjoyed by birds as much as by humans!

CARE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS : Towards the end of September, sunflower seeds start to reach maturity. The stem dries up and the flower starts to bend down. It’s time to harvest! Cut the entire flower heads. Let them dry in a dry space. Check regularly to make sure the sunflowers are not getting moldy. After a few days, the seeds will sound ‘hollow’ and ‘dry’ when running your fingers over them. You then only need to rub over to remove what’s left of the flowers, and scratch with your fingers to detach the seeds.
Hopi Black Dye Sunflower
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Hopi Black Dye sunflowers grow tall and strong, and their flower have sunny yellow petals with a dark purple center. This sunflower variety comes from the Hopi, a Native American tribe, who used it for dyeing. They used it to create grey and purples hues on their basketry and textiles, like cotton and wool. The seeds are edible for humans and birds, and are rich and easy to shell.

CARE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS : Towards the end of September, sunflower seeds start to reach maturity. The stem dries up and the flower starts to bend down. It’s time to harvest! Cut the entire flower heads. Let them dry in a dry space. Check regularly to make sure the sunflowers are not getting moldy. After a few days, the seeds will sound ‘hollow’ and ‘dry’ when running your fingers over them. You then only need to rub over to remove what’s left of the flowers, and scratch with your fingers to detach the seeds.
Dyer's Coreopsis
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dyer's coreopsises are originally from the North American prairies. Their bloom is abundant, colorful, and a delight for pollinators. As its name suggests, it is commonly used for natural dyes. Coreopsis gives rich yellows, oranges, and rusty browns. It works especially well on fiber proteins such as wool and silk.
Roumanian flax (Linum usitatissimum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Before the introduction of cotton and synthetic fibers, flax held a significant place in Quebecois households of yore. It was used everywhere, from bed sheets to stockings! And even before that, this plant has quite a history! Flax was likely the first plant fiber to be woven. It is believed to have been first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region. Remains dating back 36,000 years have been found in a cave in Georgia. It was also a preferred textile in ancient Egypt. The fiber produces a fabric that is supple, lightweight, absorbent, thermoregulating, and durable, which explains its popularity. The plant is easy to cultivate, and its delicate blue flowers add to its charm. The fibers are found in the core of the stem and are extracted through a controlled decomposition process called retting.

The flax from Romania is part of the flax preservation program

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS Information and photographs provided by Kevin Prescott during his participation in the Program.

Number of seeds per packet: 200
Palestinian flax (Linum usitatissimum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD

Before the introduction of cotton and synthetic fibers, linen held a significant place in the households of old Quebec. It was used everywhere, from sheets to socks! And even before that, this plant has quite a history! Linen was probably the first plant fiber to be woven. It is believed to have been first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region. Remains dating back 36,000 years have been found in a cave in Georgia. It was also a preferred textile in ancient Egypt. The fiber yields a flexible, lightweight, absorbent, thermoregulating, and durable fabric, which explains its popularity. The plant is easy to grow, and its delicate blue flowers are charming. The fibers are located in the core of the stem and are extracted through a controlled decomposition process called retting.

The Palestinian linen is part of the Linen Preservation Program. It is cultivated for its fibers.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Little information exists about this linen. It originates from Palestine and was cultivated before 1955.

Number of seeds per packet: 200